Prevention

The desire to solve a problem takes the ego out of asking questions and driving for answers. When one teacher speaks up, empowers all teachers to speak up. CS builds this desire to research details to solve personal problems. That is why when I was I had surgery to repair my heart valve, I researched why my hand swelled up. Thrombus in the vein causes pain and irritation and may block blood flow in the veins. Injury to a vein increases the risk of forming a blood clot. This phlebitis occurred where a peripheral intravenous line drip with amiodarone hydrochloride was used.  They were supposed to take the line out the night before as this sometimes happens and the medicine was finished.  But, alas, they did not.  I wish I had been more pro-active. I woke up in the morning with a swollen hand. An Ultrasound detected blood lots.

I asked also what caused burns on by back and legs with one raw spot.  I wondered if both these issues which added to the pain could have been prevented. Never have gotten an answer.  But, as I walked for recovery I looked out at Rice University across the street.  I wondered if there were students over there who might do research to solve medical issues like their through better engineering and design.  I wondered how many Rice students walked across the street to talk to patient liaisons and nurses who could be a bridge for young entrepreneurs.

Anything that makes the patient more comfortable is worth the improvement.  When I see a problem my mind immediately goes into finding solutions.  My brain from decades of searching for solutions to my student’s learning problems goes into debug, debug, debug mode. We were told not to stretch the chest, yet the toilet paper holder was too far back to reach (and the drippy soap dispenser was right above it.) So I left on the roll stacked on the floor as was told could not have a hook to the shower bar due to safety regulations.  The physical therapist who came by said there were many suggestions they had in the process of building the new Methodist Hospital wing, but were turned down due to building codes.

Sounds like my life as a teacher, lots of ideas to improvement classrooms, yet after decades little has changed.  But, I did solve one problem in my hospital room.  I had my husband bring me a hook to hold the nurse call button where I could easily get to it.  Another challenge to solve is the dirt that I looked at on the bottom of the archaic cart, which is really hard to position to eat.  And for that matter, the cart’s drawers did not open.  Seems the same one they have been using for decades.  My daughter had to clean the wheelchair as filthy, but nice the nurse suggested she take me for a walk to the prayer garden.  Talk about very impressive design.  Now to get that design thinking into other improvements.  Could make a better holder for the heating pad, which I would have done had I been there longer, but thank goodness, only had to stay for 7 horrible days.  Sure motivates me to focus on preventing health problems.

This is what drives me to continue to volunteer to help your learners.  My 2nd grade grandson when asked what rules are needed in school said, “All classrooms need maker spaces where kids can play and talk together.”  He gets it, so why do schools continue to use B&W worksheets instead of creating their own math problems and stories?  My rule – All school must provide equitable time for innovation and creative projects that are designed by each unique learners, instead of a one-size fits all questions.  I was recovering during CSEdWeek and Hour of Code, so was not able to motivate more schools and teachers to take part.  In the equitable time, I wish all schools would provide time for “Hour of Code” each week, with the majority of that time on unplugged lessons, which can be done in maker spaces.  After all, as a White House Champion of Change for CS Education, I must continue to be a change agent.  I must continue to advocate for prevention time equal to intervention time.